Author: Mike Puma

Mike Puma

Writing for Buffalo Rising since 2009 covering development news, historic preservation, and Buffalo history. Works professionally in historic preservation.

Route 62: Photography Pop Up is a one-night only event to be held at Macky’s Shamrock Room, 1634 Bailey Avenue, on Friday, April 5, 2019, 6 to 11 pm. The show will direct the lenses of three photographers and a special guest videographer toward Route 62, the only U.S. highway to enter the City of Buffalo limits. Buffalo Obscura collaborators Chris Hawley, Molly Jarboe, and Christina Laing will be joined by videographer Jim Cielencki for the special event. Additionally, Mark Von Kohler, now traveling to Buffalo from Texas on Route 62, is assembling a cross-country 100-photograph grid to be featured at…

Read More

Unlock Lockport is holding a one night only photography gallery at the Lockport Masonic Lodge, 1 Cottage Street, on Friday, March 22, 6-11 pm. The gallery will feature five local Lockport photographers and the Buffalo Obscura photography group. The event will be themed on the concept of ‘Reviving Greatness’ found in the surviving historic elements of downtown Lockport for inspiration for the city’s future. Tours of the rarely seen Lockport Masonic Temple will be available! Limited runs of displayed prints will be available for sale at a flat $25 each. The event will be cash only. All photo sales will…

Read More

The development team hoping to take a can opener to the exterior of the former Record Theatre building has released renderings of what the block could look like once the corrugated metal comes down and rehab work is completed. A leasing package has been formally issued by the team, which can be seen here and any leasing inquiries can be directed to the contacts at the end of this post. Based on a combination of the original drawings and recent investigative work, the vision for the building’s reuse is coming into focus. Since the original post came out last week, several…

Read More

Local developer and attorney Jason Yots is leading a group of young developers hoping to breathe new life into a landmark building on Main Street in Buffalo. The team – consisting of BuffaLove Development, Preservation Studios, Urban Vantage, and Yots’ Common Bond Real Estate – has announced a plan to adapt the former Record Theatre buildings at 1786 Main Street into a mixed-use facility that they envision will include food-based retail, neighborhood services and destination entertainment and recreation facilities.  The team also is considering a rental housing component for the project. Located directly across Main Street from Canisius College’s Koessler…

Read More

Main Street: Photography Pop Up is a one-night only event to be held at the former AM&A’s department store, 377 Main Street, on Friday, December 7, 2018, 6 to 11 pm. The show will direct the lenses of photographers toward Main Street—the literal and the representative. Brendan Bannon, Joel Brenden, Linda Gellman, Chris Hawley, Molly Jarboe, Christina Laing, Amy Luraschi, Greg Meadows, Tom Schmitt, Ginny Rose Stewart, and David Torke are the participating photographers, and Chris Kameck is a participating visual artist. “We’re going downtown!” says Christina Laing, a co-organizer. “No place so powerfully invokes Buffalo holiday memories like the AM&A’s…

Read More

Eugene V. Debs may be the most consequential historical figure you’ve never heard about. This November 5 that’ll change! Buffalo’s first annual Eugene V. Debs Day will take place at Adam Mickiewicz Library & Dramatic Circle, 612 Fillmore Avenue, on Monday, November 5, 6-10 pm. “This event will mark the 163rd birthday of Eugene V. Debs, the great American labor organizer, anti-war activist, and democratic socialist,” says Chris Hawley, event organizer. “We’re bringing together about twenty organizations that are continuing the Debs legacy in Buffalo, and you’ll be able to connect with them all at the event.” Debs Day is a…

Read More

The Legacy City Preservation summit is at the forefront of using historic preservation and heritage to solve some of the Rust Belt’s most pressing and prevailing issues. As we think about what kind of city we want to become, we must address the issues of inequality, environmental justice, and community development. Our cities and our neighborhoods must be for everyone. How can preservation of our heritage play a role in this? The conference idea began in Cleveland in 2012, as a mitigating factor in the demolition of an historic building. In exchange for not fighting the demolition of the Wolfe…

Read More

Buffalo South: Photography Pop Up is slated as a one-night only event this Friday, April 20, 6 pm to midnight, at Liberty Seneca, 2221 Seneca Street. Buffalo South will direct the lenses of nine photographers toward the people, places, and things that represent the City of Buffalo south of the I-190 and east of Michigan Avenue. Jim Cielencki, Shannon Davis, Lindsay DeDario, Chris Hawley, Molly Jarboe, Christina Laing, David Torke, Tom Warner, and Gene Witkowski are the participating photographers. Liberty Seneca is a former Liberty Bank branch designed in a Sullivanesque style and built in 1921, with interior architectural details…

Read More

The Western New York Books Arts Center’s 10th annual Edible Book Festival will take place this Saturday, March 31st, from 3:00-6:00pm. International Edible Book Festivals take place on or around April Fool’s Day every year throughout the world. This event is family friendly and invites participants to to create edible versions of their favorite books that are exhibited, documented, and then consumed. Creations are ranked by local celebrity judges, and chefs are awarded with prizes donated from local businesses around Buffalo. All proceeds from ticket sales, entry fees, and basket raffles go towards ongoing programming at the WNY Book Arts…

Read More

By: Phillip Borrelli and Jason Yots1 New York preservationists, developers and their communities dodged a bullet in late 2017, only to face another round in the new year.  Last year, partisan tax reform bills in Congress first eliminated the federal historic tax credit (HTC), then eventually retained a weakened version of the popular preservation incentive.  As we described in our October 24th guest essay in the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle2, the HTC has been a powerful and efficient economic development catalyst since its inception, generating billions of dollars of investment and thousands of jobs in Rust Belt regions.  The federal…

Read More