Share, , , Google Plus, Reddit, Pinterest, StumbleUpon

Print

Posted in:

Urban Planning & Community Engagement Forum on the Scajaquada Corridor

On Wednesday, December 13, the community is invited to attend an engineering and urban planning presentation, concerning the Scajaquada Corridor and NYSDOT’s Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS – comment deadline December 18) and position. The forum will be headed up by Ian Lockwood P.E., who is a Livable Transportation Engineer with the Toole Design Group, with offices from Boston to Portland.

Lockwood is not only an early advocate for urban road diets, one of his projects, to replace a major highway project with a Smart Growth Project (along New Jersey Route 31), won Institute of Transportation Engineers’ (ITE) Project of the Year. Now, Lockwood will talk about that success, and others, and how they can help Buffalo to thoughtfully transition the Scajaquada Expressway into a transportation project that is balanced with urbanist sensibilities. 

The forum will take place at the Burchfield-Penney Art Center, from 6pm to 8pm, on Wednesday, December 18 – 1300 Elmwood Avenue.

Written by Buffalo Rising

Buffalo Rising

Sometimes the authors at Buffalo Rising work on collaborative efforts in order to cover various events and stories. These posts can not be attributed to one single author, as it is a combined effort. Often times a formation of a post gets started by one writer and passed along to one or more writers before completion. At times there are author attributions at the end of one of these posts. Other times, “Buffalo Rising” is simply offered up as the creator of the article. In either case, the writing is original to Buffalo Rising.

View All Articles by Buffalo Rising
Hide Comments
Show Comments
  • Matthew Ricchiazzi

    It would be awesome to also start thinking about seamlessly integrating the Buffalo State College campus into the broader Delaware Park setting… turning parking lots into leafy quadrangles, resurrecting Scajaquada Creek, and cleaning up the industrially defunct areas of Blackrock with new greenscapes… https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/c7f9db2d8c9e2d239e5d4166a8c5f5c8ac71333be4906dd3849bbad1ae527977.jpg

    • Matthew Ricchiazzi
    • PaulBuffalo

      ‘We should also start thinking about seamlessly integrating the Buffalo State College campus into the broader Delaware Park setting….’

      Will you be integrating dorms into your newly-announced zoo master plan? It would alleviate overcrowding.

      • Matthew Ricchiazzi

        No, but what could be architecturally interesting for the Buffalo State campus, if done right, would be a few multilevel parking garages that allow for the removal of the excessive amount of surface parking lots on the campus. If done correctly, the parking garages could feature retail storefronts at ground level and office/administration or instruction spaces atop parking structures.

        • eagercolin

          If you’re paying for it, I’m sure Buff State would be happy to do it.

  • Jonnno

    This forum sounds interesting but realistically, I think it is a case of too little, too late. The DOT has already made up their mind about what they are going to do with the 198. At this point in the game they are either going to go with the current parkway proposal or, if they feel the community as a whole is against that, they will pull the plug and spend the funds allocated for the 198 elsewhere in the state. Then it will be another 60 years before they consider major changes to the Scajaquada.

    • Matthew Ricchiazzi

      It’s better to pull the plug on the project for a year or two to get the design right. This is a once in a generation opportunity. It’s too important to stand down on some incompetent bureaucrat’s threat. They work for us, not the other way around.

    • 300miles

      It would probably be fine if the DOT did just pull the plug and walk away in a huff. Because the current configuration is temporary and incomplete, there’s no way it will be allowed to stay this way for another 60 years. Cuomo used his office to force the current changes and I don’t think he’d be ok with the DOT just leaving it this way forever. The pressure from Buffalo to fix it will be there until something happens. It may take a few years to get the funding again, but IMO it won’t be a lifetime.

      The alternative is the DOT pushing through with their plans for the “prettier-freeway-with-traffic-lights” design they came up with. If that happens we will definitely be stuck with it for another 60 years.

  • grovercleveland

    Once the DOT is finished with their project what will this website have to write about?

    • eagercolin

      Restaurants that allow dogs on their patio is an inexhaustible topic.

  • Cvepo

    Oh boy another community gathering about the 198

  • Louis Tully

    The anti-obstructionists love to use the word progress. Progress this. Progress that. This would be real progress. The cities that have removed highways are progressive.

    A drastic change to the 198 would take guts. Buffalo doesn’t have any guts.

    • Bills Future QB

      What cities are those?

      • Louis Tully

        San Francisco, Seoul, Portland, Milwaukee, Madrid. Numerous are proposed or in the works – Dallas and Seattle to name a couple.

        • Cvepo

          Don’t forget Rochester!

          • Jonathan Hutchison

            And Niagara Falls