Share, , , Google Plus, Reddit, Pinterest, StumbleUpon

Print

Posted in:

Stay in a Historic Haven at the Central Park Belt Line Train Station

Are you a resident of WNY looking for a cool “staycation” spot? Or looking to visit Buffalo and want a home to rent for the week? Check out “The Station” home located at the corner of Starin Avenue and Amherst Street. The Station was originally owned by Buffalo Cement and leased by New York Central and Hudson River Railroad. Built in 1897, it was known as the Bennett Station. After WWI, the Beltline gradually faded from existence due to the development of trolley lines and automobiles. It was sold to the Boy Scouts to be used as a scout’s headquarters until after WWII. It is the only surviving station on the Belt Line.

The current owners are Patrick Nehin (president) and Saschi Nehin (partner) of Swiss Packaging LLC of NY and Switzerland, which is a luxury brand development and design company with extensive experience in jewelry and watch packaging and display.

Leaving the historic shell intact, the Nehin’s designed a modern retreat. The 1,645-square-foot train station now features 2 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms. The kitchen was originally added when the Boy Scouts bought the building, it has since been upgraded to feature a contemporary design with stainless steel appliances. The living room, which was once the train station’s waiting room, now features a theater-quality sound system and a large screen TV. Also, the home is fully automated.

Other amenities include a pool and jacuzzi. The home is set back off the street, and has its own short cobblestone access road. Surrounded by trees and beautiful landscaping, the design gives you the feeling of being secluded in your own forest hideaway.

Chadwick Bozeman, star of the movie “Marshall,” stayed in the home during filming. It was also featured on HGTV’s show “You Live In What.” And most recently was featured on WIVB News Channel 4, Check out the video here.

The Station is located near Hertel’s commercial strip and within walking distance to Delaware Park and the Buffalo Zoo. The Station can be yours for about $200 per night. See the full Airbnb listing here.

Photos courtesy of Patrick Nehin.

Written by Jessica Marinelli

Jessica Marinelli is a WNY native, born and raised in the Lincoln Park area of Tonawanda. She has been involved in local politics from an early age and is currently a Tonawanda Democratic Committee Member. As an avid equestrian and animal-lover, she trained and re-homed over 40 horses. For over a decade, she was an event planner with the law firm, Hodgson Russ LLP, and now owns her own marketing and event management company. She has worked with international and national organizations on large and small scale events. Jessica writes on politics and local events, as well as working with Buffalo Rising as a social reporter.

View All Articles by Jessica Marinelli
Hide Comments
Show Comments
  • Buffaloexpat

    Airbnb is a way to skip hotel taxes and the safety requirements (fire escapes, etc) associated with short term rentals. It creates a dangerous grey market

    • Bringing back Buffalo

      Not at all. If it’s safe enough for the owner it’s safe enough for a guest.

      • Buffaloexpat

        Right. Becaue people don’t die in house fires because of non functional alarms, non operational doors and illegal bedrooms

    • Johnny Pizza

      Hotel taxes are a way of extracting ever more money out of our pockets, despite it having already been thoroughly taxed as income.

      • flancrest

        Actually hotel taxes are how cities tax everyone but their residents to provide services. Unless you live in a hotel, in which case you can afford to pay some taxes.

        • Johnny Pizza

          Don’t hotels pay property taxes that are indirectly paid for by the hotel guests, which tax dollars go to the same municipalities that residents pay property taxes too?

  • BlackRockLifer

    I believe this station is the only beltline station built of brick ( outside of downtown). The stations here in Black Rock were modest one story frame structures that no longer exist.