Share, , , Google Plus, Reddit, Pinterest, StumbleUpon

Print

Posted in:

The Reddy Bikeshare Results Are In…

The Reddy Bikeshare results are in.

After officially launching on July 21 with 200 “smart” bicycles with GPS capabilities located at 35 stations throughout the city, the stats have been compiled thus far.

  • 11,986 trips
  • 17,614 miles traveled
  • 766,080 calories burned

“On behalf of Shared Mobility, the not-for-profit organization that brought Reddy Bikeshare to Buffalo, and Independent Health, our community partner, we want to thank everyone who helped us make 2016 a great success,” said Jennifer White, marketing and communications executive for Reddy bikeshare. “We asked local residents and out-of-town visitors to ‘Get Reddy Buffalo’ and they enthusiastically responded. We are now focusing on efforts to increase membership and ridership next year, including more guided group rides, and some possible expansion plans as well.”

In 15 weeks, the total distance traveled by Reddy bikeshare members equaled the round trip distance from Buffalo to New Zealand and the total calories burned was the equivalent of nearly 7,500 chicken wings, minus the blue cheese.

It just goes to show that Buffalo was waiting for a bikeshare program of this nature. It also goes to show that if Buffalonians are provided with cycling amenities, they readily eat it up. At the same time, we still need more dedicated bike lanes, bike racks, and everything else that goes along with productive bike culture. At some point, we’re also going to need a velodrome! There’s no reason to look towards the future of cycling in Buffalo!

A bike trip around the city

“Independent Health is excited to support Reddy bikeshare while continuing to sponsor events such as Slow Roll Buffalo, SkyRide Buffalo and numerous other activities that encourage our members – and the entire Buffalo Niagara region – to embrace fitness and a healthy lifestyle,” said Dr. Cropp.

Shared Mobility CEO Michael Galligano said Reddy bikeshare’s inaugural season resulted in 1,700 riders, “We have seen riders using Reddy bikeshare for both recreational use and going to and from errands and work,” said Galligano.

“Preliminary survey findings have yielded that 20 percent of respondents stated their primary reason for using Reddy bikeshare was to go to work or do personal errands,” said Galligano, adding “many of these trips are replacing the use of a personal vehicle.”

“Our data indicates a significant number of students from Buffalo State College used Reddy bikes to get to Wegmans and Tops, so we expect even more students will use them in the spring semester” said White. “We are also anticipating growth and increased ridership in and around the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, the Elmwood Village, Forest Lawn Cemetery, and the Lower West Side.”

In 2017, Reddy bikeshare will be adding new hubs, including one at the Turner Lofts at 295 Niagara Street. Reddy Bike is also looking for more partners at key locations.

Looking back, other highlights for the 15-week Reddy bikeshare season in 2016 include:

  • The most popular stations were at Canalside, Buffalo State College and Bidwell Parkway
  • The average trip distance was 2.1 miles
  • The longest trip was 66 miles, in which a couple of riders trekked to Niagara Falls and back
  • The average rider burned 543 calories; the most active riders burned over 5,000 this season
  • The most active member took 97 trips
  • Average trip duration from annual pass holders was 33 minutes
  • Average trip duration from hourly and group pass holders was 50 minutes

In 2017, Reddy bike is partnering with local bike shops to offer discounts on bike helmets.

“We encourage questions, comments and suggestions on how to improve Reddy bikeshare in the coming year. We are already gearing up for season two and can’t wait to offer the service again come spring.” added White.

Share, , , Google Plus, Reddit, Pinterest, StumbleUpon

Written by Buffalo Rising

Buffalo Rising

Sometimes the authors at Buffalo Rising work on collaborative efforts in order to cover various events and stories. These posts can not be attributed to one single author, as it is a combined effort. Often times a formation of a post gets started by one writer and passed along to one or more writers before completion. At times there are author attributions at the end of one of these posts. Other times, “Buffalo Rising” is simply offered up as the creator of the article. In either case, the writing is original to Buffalo Rising.

View All Articles by Buffalo Rising
  • BufChester

    Considering the comments that are likely to be posted about this story, it time for Bike Complaint Bingo!
    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2836a8b8460aa18292b62d35c32d9178d965974d5886964bbdc86d34bff9406d.jpg

  • OldFirstWard

    What about the income? How much does a bike rental cost and how much revenue did all the bikes bring in? Was there any crashes?

  • Rational Thought

    These numbers are laughably pathetic.

    “17,614 miles traveled” A real cyclist will do almost that single handedly in a year.

    “The average rider burned 543 calories” You burn that many calories sleeping everything night.

    “11,986 trips” That’s only about 33 trips a day meaning of the 200 bikes, 167 weren’t used.

    “The average trip distance was 2.1 miles””Average trip duration from annual pass holders was 33 minutes” Making the average speed, 4 miles an hour. That’s laughably slow on a bike. Even the must out of shape person should be able to go 10 miles an hour ave at least. Real cyclists maintain 20 miles per hour average.

    “The most active member took 97 trips” Meaning the most active member still only used it only for about 3 months. Oh look summer is 3 months long. It’s as almost if people don’t want to ride bikes when the weather is crappy.

    “Average trip duration from hourly and group pass holders was 50 minutes” You mean people that rented something for an hour kept it for an hour? You don’t say.

    • Bob

      “‘The average trip distance was 2.1 miles’ ‘Average trip duration from annual pass holders was 33 minutes’ Making the average speed, 4 miles an hour. That’s laughably slow on a bike.”

      Not sure why you’d think a person is riding the bike for the entire duration of their trip. You don’t seem to understand the basic concept of the system. Or transportation itself, for that matter.

    • EZ Liv’in

      It’s average 114 trips per day for the 15 weeks. If you follow the laws they are also going by check in check out times, 4 miles per hour sounds correct their not built for speed. Even checking the average speed on my car says 19 mph when drive 35-45 most of the time.

      • Rational Thought

        “17,000+ for one cyclist Hahahahahahah where do you get that number from”

        Sunday 70 mile ride.
        Monday 25 mile easy recovery ride.
        Tuesday 50 mile training ride.
        Wednesday 50 mile training ride.
        Thursday 50 mile training ride.
        Friday 25 mile recovery ride.
        Saturday 70 mile ride.

        Total miles per week. 340 miles.
        340miles * 52 weeks in year = 17680 miles in year.

        • EZ Liv’in

          So did you get your 50 miles in yesterday?

    • No_Illusions

      Real cyclists have their own bikes…

      • John Dickens

        Yep. and ‘not real’ cyclist are bike share riders. Enjoy your spandex.

        • No_Illusions

          Well I just meant that if you commute daily on a bike, you probably already own a bike.

          Bike Shares are great for tourists, visitors and infrequent riders.

        • Marc Rebmann

          spandex owns, will do

      • Mr. B

        “Real cyclists have their own bikes…”

        . . . Just as “real” drivers have their own cars. They never rent any.

        .

    • Marc Rebmann

      The absolute top distance riders in the area are just shy of 10k a year. Let’s see your strava Mr 17k. LOL

      • Jordan Then

        Guys, Rational Thought is a troll. Stop feeding him.

        • JayDBuffalo

          This ^

    • Matt Costuros

      >”17,614 miles traveled” A real cyclist will do almost that single handedly in a year.

      A real cyclist is someone who rides a bike. Even the most diehard riders have to plan out how to ride 10,000 miles.

      >”The average rider burned 543 calories” You burn that many calories sleeping everything night.

      Sure you burn 543 calories overnight – in an 8 hour period.
      These riders burned the 543 calories in a short ride. 50 minutes based on the average ride time below. (24hr*60min/hr / 50 min/ride * 543 cal/ride = 15538 calories per day!)

      >”11,986 trips” That’s only about 33 trips a day meaning of the 200 bikes, 167 weren’t used.

      The bike share was not available for 365 days in 2016. Bob pointed out the article mentioned 6 weeks starting in July. 11986 / (7 days/week * 6weeks) = 285 trips! HOW IS THAT POSSIBLE IF THERE ARE ONLY 200 BIKES? OH Thats where the SHARE part comes in!

      Bob already covered the point of ave distance, time, and the whole point of transportation in general.

      >”The most active member took 97 trips” Meaning the most active member still only used it only for about 3 months. Oh look summer is 3 months long. It’s as almost if people don’t want to ride bikes when the weather is crappy.

      Again this system was only active for 6 weeks. 97 / (7 days/week * 6 weeks) = 2.3 trips per day average.

      >”Average trip duration from hourly and group pass holders was 50 minutes” You mean people that rented something for an hour kept it for an hour? You don’t say.

      Perfect! The point of the 1 hour limit is to prevent people from hogging a bike all day. As shown above there were an average of 285 trips per day using 200 bikes. With a 1 hour time limit this will ensure enough turnover on the bikes so people arent stuck waiting around for a bike

    • Mr. B

      “Real cyclists maintain 20 miles per hour average.”

      Maybe in the Tour de France or in a velodrome — these bikes weren’t provided for either one.

      .

      • Rational Thought

        Tour de france riders average 25 mph. Recreational rider should have no problem doing 20.

        • sbrof

          This comment proves your don’t ride very often and are just trolling. I commute 6 miles each way to work every day the weather allows, about 7-8 months a year and only get to 1,200 miles a year. 17k for one person is way more than an ‘average rider.’ I also go about 12 to 15 mph on average. To maintain 20 on anything than a very expensive road bike, which these are not, is near impossible.

          • BlackRockLifer

            Agree, I rode to work for about 10 years back in the 80’s, your stats are accurate, Rational thought once again hasn’t got a clue.

        • Mr. B

          “Recreational rider should have no problem doing 20.”

          Unless that recreational rider is, say, 6-10 years of age.

          Do yourself a favor: change your screen name from “Rational Thought” to “Irrational Blather” — its much more descriptive.

          .

  • grovercleveland

    I think bike sharing programs are great. I used it in Montreal and saw the whole city, enjoyed a nice day outside, only spent $7 and got some exercise (whilst bar crawling). I think the city should promote.

  • Wally Balls

    My problem with this service is the monthly membership fee. Just let me take a bike, without having to “join” something, so you can bilk me for a few scheckles next month on a renewal.

    • Josh Robinson

      I agree with you there. I used the NiceRide bike share in Minneapolis and was able to buy a 3-day pass for $10 that allowed for unlimited 30 minute trips. No membership needed, which is great for tourists.

      Their system is a little different though as you have to return the bikes to the hubs after each ride. But they have a much denser network of hubs than ReddyBike. Hopefully we’ll work our way toward that kind of coverage.

      • grovercleveland

        Thats how it worked for me in Montreal. I was able to purchase a 24 hour pass for $7.00, but had to return bikes every 30 minutes (and then take a new one). They had dozens of hubs. I didn’t check, but I’m sure there were weekly/monthly/hourly options. When you pay you were given a ticket similar to a buffalo subway ticket.

        • John Dickens

          Montreal, is an excellent example of public money used for bicycle sharing. They actually put millions of dollars (from tax payer money) into the system and basically promoted it as public transit. Hence why there was so many locations. Again, from my understanding, this service took $0 of public,

      • John Dickens

        From my understanding of transportation, a lot of these programs are heavily subsidized by state and local government. This system took no tax dollars to launch.

      • Wally Balls

        ReddyBike interacted with me a bit on Twitter this summer regarding this issue. I no longer live in the city, but frequent it often. Why should I be required to join something? Day passes should be available.

  • mightyNiagara

    LOL what business justifies it’s progress by calories burned?!!!!!

    • Billybobn

      “Reddy bikeshare is just one of the ways we’re working to improve the health and well-being of all Western New Yorkers.” – Independent Health

    • greenca

      Besides what Billybobn said, weight loss and fitness business would justify their (or using your grammar, “they’re”) progress by tracking the calories their customers burned.

      • mightyNiagara

        or using your stupid, “stupid” …stupid.

  • benfranklin

    These things seemed to get used at higher rate than the similarly placed blue bikes a year or two before. Small part of me wants to say that some of the positive tourist articles led to at least a small uptick in people travelling here. If you expected to find Uber and didn’t rent a car (more people than you realize), these were an alternative.

  • Mytwocents

    “In 15 weeks, the total distance traveled by Reddy bikeshare members equaled the round trip distance from Buffalo to New Zealand and the total calories burned was the equivalent of nearly 7,500 chicken wings, minus the blue cheese.” Never calculate chicken wing calories without the bleu cheese. Never.

  • TLH

    Yes, we need a velodrome! Also, Reddy Bikeshare is awesome. Looking forward to a great 2017.

  • Hamlin Park Rugger

    Bike Share stations at the light rail stations would apparently make way too much sense…

    Generally I love this service though!