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Beast Friends by Welch @ Artsphere

By Doreen E. Deboth

If you love dogs or have ever rescued one, you
won’t want to miss “Beast Friends,” a collection of highly detailed paintings
by Buffalo artist Jacqueline Welch opening at 6:30PM on Friday, May 1, at Artsphere
Studio & Gallery
.

Intrigued by animal minds, behaviors and
emotions, as well as by the animal/human bond, Welch uses rescued dogs as
models, advocating for their inherent value and their right to be life-long
companions.  Placing them in
beautiful, intricate and luminous landscapes that are often unsettling, Welch adds
a secondary object or character investing the scene with irony and humor, as in
the above painting Patron Saint of the Wrinkly
.

“These dogs oversee the revelation of
commonplace human flaws and idiosyncrasies,” explains Welch.  Then the artist gives them divine
status or saintly presence by the addition of halos.  Such supporting elements are often derived from Christian or
Celtic images, and are symbolic of her Irish-Catholic heritage.

Artsphere is located at 466 Amherst Street
between Elmwood and Grant Streets. Hours are: Thurs. & Fri. from 12-5 and
Sat. from 11-3 or by appointment (873.2784/510.4007). The show continues
through May 30.

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Share, , , Google Plus, Reddit, Pinterest, StumbleUpon

Print

Posted in:

Beast Friends by Welch @ Artsphere

By Doreen E. Deboth

If you love dogs or have ever rescued one, you
won’t want to miss “Beast Friends,” a collection of highly detailed paintings
by Buffalo artist Jacqueline Welch opening at 6:30PM on Friday, May 1, at Artsphere
Studio & Gallery
.

Intrigued by animal minds, behaviors and
emotions, as well as by the animal/human bond, Welch uses rescued dogs as
models, advocating for their inherent value and their right to be life-long
companions.  Placing them in
beautiful, intricate and luminous landscapes that are often unsettling, Welch adds
a secondary object or character investing the scene with irony and humor, as in
the above painting Patron Saint of the Wrinkly
.

“These dogs oversee the revelation of
commonplace human flaws and idiosyncrasies,” explains Welch.  Then the artist gives them divine
status or saintly presence by the addition of halos.  Such supporting elements are often derived from Christian or
Celtic images, and are symbolic of her Irish-Catholic heritage.

Artsphere is located at 466 Amherst Street
between Elmwood and Grant Streets. Hours are: Thurs. & Fri. from 12-5 and
Sat. from 11-3 or by appointment (873.2784/510.4007). The show continues
through May 30.

Written by Buffalo Rising

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