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Kleinhans Tours

Generations of Buffalonians have grown up with Kleinhans Music Hall; they’ve attended Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra concerts and walked across its stage during high school and college graduations; they attended parties and weddings there.
Despite all this, or perhaps because of it, it is easy to take Kleinhans Music Hall for granted. A national historic landmark, it is an international architectural treasure, renowned for its modern, organic design and acoustical excellence.
It was 70 years ago this year that the hall was designed by Finnish American architect Eliel Saarinen and his son Eero. As marvelous as the hall is, there are many stories to be discovered both inside and outside the music hall. A rare opportunity exists this year to have a comprehensive tour of the outside and inside of the music hall is happening — the first tour takes place this Saturday, July 12 at 10 AM. The tour features the exterior of the music hall with its stone and brick facade, the busts of Chopin and Verdi, the recently restored reflecting pool and the surrounding stunningly beautiful landscape designed by Frederick Law Olmsted that influenced the building’s design.
Inside you’ll see spaces that are off-limits to the general public and see the beauty of the Saarinens’ design without the usual accompanying throngs. You’ll also see rare and priceless furniture designed especially for the music hall by Eero Saarinen and Charles Eames that won an international design competition in 1940.
The building is so special it was identified by Hugh Ferriss in 1953’s Power in Buildings as one of the most significant modern buildings in America and was solicited by the National Park Service as one of Saarinen’s most significant designs in the U.S., being a building “important to all Americans.”
Don’t miss this rare tour opportunity rarely offered. The tour is only $10 and benefits the Kleinhans Music Hall restoration fund and Kleinhans Community Association. For more information, click here.

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