Share, , , Google Plus, Reddit, Pinterest, StumbleUpon

Print

Posted in:

Blogging Food in Buffalo

In its most basic form a blog is defined as a website where the entries are dated. With the increased presence of the internet in virtually everyone’s life, blogs have become a way for many people to source their news and gossip, fact find about things they’re interested in, and even network. Technology and programming have evolved to the point where blogs are so commonplace that people dedicate their energies to documenting trifling subject matter such as the daily life of their house cat or their obsession with fabric softener sheets.
So, it’s no surprise that blogging about food is at an all time high. Food as art, entertainment, sustenance and commerce offers up a vast array of blogging options. Food blogging has become so popular that there are even Food Blogging Awards, which, if you frequent the internet’s world of food entertainment with any frequency, are actually a pretty big deal.
Here in the WNY region we have a good number of food blogs, some better than others. Again, we’re talking about food dedicated blog-style websites here, not Trip Advisor, foupons.com, or other sites that have their own objectives. Some of them are an off-shoot of an existing media operation while others are tended to by individuals. The most difficult part of blogging as a hobby is developing and posting content on a regular basis. Right now I believe that there are only two or three of of us that are paid to blog, so keep that in mind when you visit these sites, some of which haven’t been updated recently.
My favorite Buffalo food blog, called Buffalo Buffet, belongs to Andrew Galarneau, a staff writer for The Buffalo News. He’s a great writer, a pretty amazing photographer and a man with a palate for ethnic food–a refreshing change from most of Buffalo’s food culture.
post%20inset.jpg
Janice Okun, food critic for The Buffalo News, has recently started blogging. It’ll be interesting to see if her site grows in popularity. Though her reviews can make or break a new restaurant, her blog is uninspired. Maybe, as time goes on, increased traffic will improve its content.
Savory & Sweet is also a lovely local site. Holloway Ortman logs most of her blogging hours posting about the things she’s made in her kitchen–simple things like pickles, oven-roasted tomatoes and vinaigrette as well as more complex undertakings like carbonnade a la flamande or roasted cornish hens.
A site with a bit of history is Blendings, maintained by local foodie Edward Wolf. It functions as more of an update on Buffalo restaurant happenings and has done so since 1998. Though it’s not very pretty to look at, a scroll through its archives provides a glimpse into Buffalo’s culinary past. We’ve come a long way, baby!
Also of note is the area of Buffalo Spree’s blog that is dedicated to food. You can access all of the related articles by clicking the Food category offered on the righthand side of the screen. It’s not comprehensive by any means, and there are rarely any comments left by readers, but it does provide some good reading, especially if your interests lie outside of the city.
estrip.org provides Elmwood area residents with a tightly knit online community and the opportunity to maintain a blog/journal without having to know html or purchase a site of their own. Like Buffalo Spree, clicking on the Food category will pull up a few hundred food-related entires, all authored by various bloggers.
There are a lot of other blogs maintained by WNY residents. They are much less formal than those noted above, but nonetheless worthy of a mention.
Tomato Egg Noodles just recently changed their blog’s focus to food. Though the entries haven’t been updated since late November, I know I’ll be keeping an eye on it.
ram.jpg
If your into cheese and wine, and many of us are these days, check out Corks and Curds, a site dedicated to these two fine distractions. It’s updated regularly and the author, James Beebe, seems to have a real passion for the subject.

Coffee & Grilled Cheese
is run somewhat anonymously by “Chris”, a Buffalonian who offers the following disclaimer on the ‘about the author’ page: “I am a slave to the public working technical support for a high-speed internet company. Most of my blog may not consist of items that do not make sense or may be one liners. This is because my intelligence is being sucked out of my brain for 8 hours every day.” Not all of the entries are about food, but most of them are. If you like recipes, chats about Sir Gordon Ramsay and a look at products new to the market, you’ll really enjoy this site. It’s updated regularly as well.
Two beverage-related blogs include beercraft, a site that–although it hasn’t been updated lately–is a great resource for beerophiles. Also, capitalizing on one of the Niagara region’s most valuable assets is this blog, Niagara Escarpment, which focuses on the art of wine with a local perspective.
Though not a typical blog, it’s important to make an exception and pay homage to Buffalo’s first internet foodie, Bill Rapaport. We conducted an interview with him a while back; click here to read through it. Rapaport’s bare bones dining guide is driven by content from diners and retains quite a bit of pull in the local industry despite the recent onslaught of somewhat similar sites (including YUM). I know many chefs and restaurant owners that check his site with regularity; a bad review can live on this site forever.
Are there other Buffalo food blogs out there that you enjoy? Maybe you even have one yourself. Do you have a favorite? What sort of topics would you like to see local food bloggers cover?

Written by Bill Zimmermann

Bill Zimmermann

Bill runs Seven Seas Sailing school, and is a staunch waterfront activist. He is also heavily involved with preserving, maintaining, and promoting the South Buffalo Lighthouse. When Bill first started writing for Buffalo Rising, he wrote an article a day for 365 days - each article coincided with a significant historic event that happened in Buffalo on that same day.

View All Articles by Bill Zimmermann
Hide Comments
Show Comments