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Big Deal: Ellicott Development Grabs Two on Franklin, Future Use Unknown

Ellicott Development Group has purchased a pair of Franklin Street buildings.  Ellicott’s Huron Group Inc. acquired buildings at 172 and 176 Franklin on October 24 from DCF LLC/D&M Properties LLC for $365,000.  The properties are north of Ellicott Development’s Crosby Building at Franklin and W. Huron streets.  They contain 8,970 sq.ft of space and a small amount of parking accessed from Bean Alley to the rear. 

William Paladino, Ellicott Development president and CEO told Buffalo Business First that there are no set plans for the buildings saying, “It could be any number of scenarios.”

IMG_1283.JPGCarl Paladino, Chairman of Ellicott Development, guest spoke at a The Center for the Study of Art, Architecture, History & Nature’s noontime lecture last December and said his company was considering conversion of the eight-story Crosby Building (below) into something other than office space:

“We took the Crosby Building and we’re in the process now of turning its use, changing its use, to something other than office because the office market is flat out.”

IMG_1282.JPGEllicott Development does not own the green building at 174 Franklin Street.  That two-story property is owned by Robert Sanders.  Huron Group Inc. filed a contact and Lis Pendens with the Erie County Clerk Recorder naming Sanders this week, which can only be seen as the first step in Ellicott acquiring that property as well.


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Written by WCPerspective


Buffalo and development junkie currently exiled in California.

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  1. 174 Franklin was home to Sanders Printing for many years. He passed away a couple years ago. It looks to me as if the Huron Group thinks it’s owed money by the estate, or the son (L), and this is there way of trying to get at the debt.

  2. While it would be a horrible idea to remove such a cool building for does bring up the question of where residents would park if the Crosby was converted to condos.
    The Crosby has floor plates of 5,800sq ft. If a conversion were done I could see 4-6 units per floor on the top 6 floors. If you were to allocate 2 spots per unit, you have 24-26 spaces needed. Just where will they park?
    If downtown Buffalo is going to turn the corner it’s going to need residential. If it’s going to have residential, it’s going to need to solve parking.

  3. I agree with your last paragraph very much. But I don’t think the solution needs to be as simple as knocking down a building and putting in a parking lot. That kind of thinking has played a part in where Buffalo is, and isn’t what gets cities ahead.
    A quick look at the area: parking ramp on Huron and several surface lots. Being next to the Statler makes parking for the Crosby more interesting a problem. Certainly a city of parking ramps isn’t ideal; but I’d rather have 5 blocks worth of parking in a 5 floor parking ramp taking just one block. Throw some offices above it, or residential.
    Knocking down a building to gain some parking spaces is silly and, frankly, going backwards. Especially when there are countless surface lots throughout the city.

  4. Why is this Titled BIG DEAL? these building will sit vacant for years…He has been on a spending spree and I imagine its because its close to the end of the year and he needs some big loss litres to even out the balance sheet….

  5. I knew you were going to go there.
    Depending on the price range of the units, covered and secure parking would be expected for most. Additionally, using parking lots not controlled by the building is just looking for trouble with potential rate hikes as well with the captive market.
    Downtown Buffalo is NOT Chicago or NYC where people will take parking where they can get it or effectively live a lifestyle without a car. Why is that so hard for people to grasp?
    I don’t know the solution but dedicated/secured and covered parking is something that needs to be considered.

  6. There was a Lis Pendens against my property when I purchased it, this was the term used to describe the demolition order that the city had in place. My lawyer advised me not to buy the house but I was able to have the Lis Pendens removed after showing good faith in my plans. I hope there are not plans to demo these.

  7. I’d like to know more about the lawsuit.
    and whats stopping Paladino from putting in some underground parking beneath the exisiting structure? why do we constantly have to be bombarded with surface lots at the expense of our streetscape?
    Its the same situation with the parking lot he put in for his loft conversion on Allen and Delaware.. the Allentown Association totally rolled over on that one and let him put a parking lot fronting Allen St. So much for protecting the historic district.
    Also- remind me again why the city doesn’t hold him accountable for his other stalled projects?

  8. Exactly, and Buffalo does not need to be Chicago or NYC. It just needs to be Portland OR or Madison WI. Stop pretending that the only solution is tearing down buildings for giant city killing parking lots.

  9. Exactly. The Allentown Association holds the average homeowner by the throat but turns a blind eye to the more noticeable delinquencies, such as the example you mentioned or the dump across from Brick Bar.
    They told my neighbor he can’t replace his vinyl windows in-kind, he would have to put wood windows back. That’s fine, but hold everyone to the same standard.

  10. Can u imangine a downtown where people can ‘walk’ out their doors and see other people ‘walking’ on the sidewalks with shops and restaurants along the first floors of buildings below other buildings where people work and live above them? How amazing that would be!

  11. I’m fairly certain that the Allentown Association did not stop your neighbor from installing windows. It is the Buffalo Preservation Board in City Hall that has control in the historic districts of Buffalo. Sometimes the Allentown Association gives their opinion to the Preservation Board, but it isn’t binding.

  12. Don’t try to interject facts… their on a roll. They’ve gone from him removing a building he doesn’t yet own for parking, to what I thought was an improvement at Allen and Delaware. Next to the up/down buttons they should add a button for “I just don’t like Carl Paladino.” It would make it easier for these folks.

  13. Can you imagine paying $1500 a month and having to walk around the block to get your car in an unsecured parking spot and having to brush off the snow so you can drive somewhere else in the area for work?

  14. take a look at an overhead view, these buildings go back pretty far.
    if he intends to demolish please at a minimum leave the facades and ~15 feet of the 3 buildings. There would still be lots of new parking and you could even work in a ramp to the basement of the crosby building or a simple 2 story ramp where the rear of the buildings were.
    this at least leaves leasable space for a small shop or store in the buildings, maybe even a larger space like a restaurant if they combine the storefronts

  15. Disappointing. This seems like an in house deal. Sinatra has been trying to sell the building next to Sander’s for awhile and now Paladino buys it.. Nothing is going to happen here.. hopefully I am wrong.

  16. I don’t want the building torn has great potential. I was just saying that parking needs to be solved.
    Maybe a section of the alley could be blocked off? Maybe a ramp? Who knows.
    My point was if you want people to move back into the city you need to provide a quality of parking outside of a public lot.

  17. I always thought a good place for a large parking ramp would be behind these buildings along Bean Alley between Mohawk and Huron. Tall and skinny, it could serve Palladino’s buildings and the Statler, but leave open the Delaware side for the existing buildings and future infill buildings. And use the alley to serve the ramp traffic. The few remaining alleys in the city aren’t used enough.

  18. …there are no set plans for the buildings saying, “It could be any number of scenarios.”
    I ran this through the BabelFish online translator — they’re beta testing their “Developerspeak to English” module. Result:
    Bye bye.
    PS: I understand that if BabelFish can get this translator perfected, they’ll do the Federal Reserve next.

  19. Could someone please build a large, reasonably attractive parking ramp (no that’s not intended to be an oxymoron) down from these buildings next to the Century Grill? One (and an admittedly ugly one) was torn down several years ago and replaced with another ugly surface parking lot. Since there’s such an apparent shortage of prime parking downtown, I don’t understand why somene hasn’t built a multi-level ramp here. It’s such an unattractive part of downtown. I’m embarrassed for visitors to the Hyatt. Out the front they glare across two blocks of surface parking. Out the front they see the most desolate block of Main Street. And how many millions in taxpayers has Paul Snyder gotten over the years?

  20. This is a little off topic but looking at an overhead view of this area over to main and beyond, it really looks like the closing of genesee and insertion of the convention center put a dimmer on this area. Would love to see genesee restored sometime.

  21. I want to move into the city into a very upscale condo. I have money. I have a car. Until Buffalo develops a comprehensive transit system similar to Chicago or NYC then I need a car and a place to park it: A very close place to park it. I have money, I am a big piece of the answer to bringing residential back to Buffalo in a big way and there are others like me. We have the money to buy properties and revitalize…and we have cars. If there is no place to park my car I am not coming into Buffalo. Plain and simple.

  22. No good?
    Well, you could always knock down a building adjacent to several parking lots and put a parking lot there…
    Hey, can we get a golf course bounded by Michigan, Genesee, Jefferson and Broadway? We could park in the lot bounded by Michigan, Broadway, Jefferson and William (paved to the curb, of course).
    Maybe the City would sell MLK Park to Ellicott/Huron/Paladino to build a parking ramp, and the site could host $1,000-a-plate fundraisers to help kick-start Driver & Parking Magazine. You could eat among the cars!
    Seriously though, I tried to offer a sensible solution to DOC’s “problem”. You want to live in the City, and you can afford to buy property, and you want to park close to your place. That’s great! So why haven’t you moved into the City? What are your must-haves when looking at real estate? Where are your geographic boundaries? I bet you could find something to fit your needs if you tried.

  23. Screw that. We know Mr. Moneybags’ criteria: very upscale condo with parking and somewhere to put his lots of money. Problem solved. Here ya go, Supercat:
    I’ll even get you in touch with a realtor:
    “We have the money to buy properties and revitalize…and we have cars”
    But apparently just shy of enough smarts to do it for yourselves. Someone else has to figure it out.

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